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General Blog




A Detailed Conversion Table for the 20-Point Scale to 100-Point Scale


07-Aug-2018

With the growing use of the 100 point rating system for wines in wine judging competitions, critics ratings and published reviews, I have found it useful to provide a more detailed conversion chart which relates my usage of the 20-point scale to the 100-point scale.

I reiterate that I believe the 20-point scale is more easily understood by consumers, and remains the standard established scale in the wine industry in the U.K. and generally in Europe. I still maintain that for the vast majority of consumers, and judges for that matter, a one-point differential in quality with the 100-point scale is practically indiscernible. The 100-point scale has grown in popularity, primarily for commercial reasons, especially in the U.S. and New World markets and the perceptions of certain scores being unconsciously valued more than their actual rating. The most obvious example is where 90 points is perceived to be in the ‘top level’, though in real terms it is a silver medal or 4-star equivalent.

Following is my conversion table for ‘medal-level’ or 3-star level wines from my 20-point scale which utilises half (1/2) points as well as plusses (+) and minuses (-) as fine tuning tools, to specific score numbers on the 100-point scale. I remind readers that I have a positive outlook on scores, and as the two scales do not match up exactly in whole numbers, I have been generous at the upper levels and the same 100-point score is given to two of my graded 20-point scores (eg: both 19.0 and 19.0- are converted to 95 points). This applies at the lower level, where a minus (-) score is 'given the benefit of the doubt'. The associated Star-Ratings are also shown. This conversion table is specific to Raymond Chan Wine Reviews.

20 Point Scale

to

100 Point Scale

Stars

20.0

 

 

 

100

 

20.0-

 

100

 

 

19.5+

 

99

 

19.5

 

 

 

98

 

19.5-

 

97

 

 

19.0+

 

96

 

19.0

 

 

 

95

 

19.0-

 

95

 

 

18.5+

 

94

 

18.5

 

 

 

93

 

18.5-

 

92

 

 

18.0+

 

91

 

18.0

 

 

 

90

 

18.0-

 

90

 

 

17.5+

 

89

 

17.5

 

 

 

88

 

17.5-

 

87

 

 

17.0+

 

86

 

17.0

 

 

 

85

 

17.0-

 

85

 

 

16.5+

 

84

 

16.5

 

 

 

83

 

16.5-

 

82

 

 

16.0+

 

81

 

16.0

 

 

 

80

 

16.0-

 

80

 

 

15.5+

 

79

 

15.5

 

 

 

78

 

15.5-

 

 

77


This conversion table can also be seen in the 'How Wines are Reviewed' page, which provides easy access to it, as well as this page giving the context in how my reviews are made.

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